Public Primary Schools

You may ask, "How do I use writing best in teaching my primary stu­dents to meet state stan­dards?" Writing to Win routines are especially suited to emerging writers. …

Ask any number of schools with primary grades from Summerton Early Childhood Center in South Carolina to home schools in western North Carolina to Emery Grade School in South Dakota. Their teachers, administrators and parents helped us realize the strengths of our instructional routines for K-2 students.

  • In our UNDERSTANDINGS routine, it is the critical-thinking journal stra­te­gies. Each strategy presents a writing task in concrete and simple ways to help students build mastery of the curriculum content one standard at a time.
  • In our STRUCTURES routine, it is the Working Portfolios for each mode of writing. They help teachers provide concrete and practical guidance for every step of the writing process: prewriting, drafting, revising, proof­read­ing, evaluating and publishing. Students become masters of their own thoughts in writing.
  • In our PATTERNS routine, it is the small and whole-group oral practice that makes all sen­tence patterns understandable for all writers. In addi­tion, all words needed to complete oral and written sentence puzzles ap­pear in the lesson. All sentences follow the rules of Standard Amer­i­can Writ­­ten English. There are no intentional errors for students to identify and cor­­rect.

Whether your public primary school students meet the Writing to Win routines in hard copies or online (Fall 2014) at www.mysatori.com, they will be engaged in writing-based learning from the first day.

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Public Elementary Schools

“What makes Writing to Win routines so effective in the learning of elementary school students?” The answer varies from school to school in our client network, but one K-5 academic coach in South Georgia says it all, …

Writing to Win teaches students to become thinking learners with growing vocabularies, and their test scores show it.” In truth, state and national tests are, in large part, vocabulary tests. Teachers, administrators and parents helped us realize the strengths of our instructional routines for grades 3-5 students.

  • In our UNDERSTANDINGS routine, it is the vocabulary-building power of the cri­tical-thinking journal stra­te­gies. When students acquire the key terms pre­­sented in the lessons, they build mastery of curriculum content one standard at a time.
  • In our STRUCTURES routine, it is the writing prompts of the Writing Cycle that tie ele­men­tary students’ writing to short and extended reading texts. The prewriting tools make analysis of the writing prompts and plan­­ning first drafts simple and orderly. Concrete and easy-to-under­stand strategies for revision and proofreading are enhanced by the account­ability of PALS (peer-assisted learning system) and a simple system of stu­dent self-assess­­ment. Student-friendly rubrics put students at ease with peer- and self-evaluation.
  • In our PATTERNS routine, it is PALS coaching one another on written prac­tice in a lesson that presents a new sentence pattern.  Grades 3-5 students discover that they learn faster and better by helping each other learn a new sentence pat­tern. In addition, all words needed to complete oral and written puz­zles appear in the lesson. All sentences follow the rules of Standard Amer­i­can Written Eng­lish. There are no intentional errors for students to identify and correct.

Whether your public elementary school students meet the Writing to Win routines in hard copies or online (Fall 2014) at www.mysatori.com, they will be engaged in writing-based learning from the first day.

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Public Middle Schools

“Getting middle school students to embrace writing is a real challenge, right?” Not with the three Writing to Win instructional routines.…

Early adolescents seek the comfort of struc­ture and design in their ever-expanding and seemingly unbuttoned social worlds. Principals, academic coaches, teachers and parents who use our rou­tines concur; the routines are perfect for the middle school concept. They helped us realize the strengths of our instructional routines for grades 6-8 students.

  • In our UNDERSTANDINGS routine, it is the design of the Daily Writing to Learn the Cur­riculum student books. The Log of Entries for Student Self-Check shows that students are keeping up with learning tasks, and student self-assess­ment keeps record of their course pro­gress.
  • In our STRUCTURES routine, it is the organization of the Working Portfolios of the Writ­ing Cycle. The standards-based writing prompts keep middle school stu­dents’ writing focused on relevant short and extended reading texts. The prewriting tools make analysis of the writing prompts and plan­­­ning first drafts straightforward and orderly. Concrete and easy-to-under­stand strategies for revision and proofreading are enhanced by the account­ability of PALS (peer-assisted learning system) and a simple system of stu­dent self-assess­­ment. Student-friendly rubrics put middle school students at ease with peer-evaluation and self-evaluation.
  • In our PATTERNS routine, it is the group oral practice of all sentence pat­terns that meets the social and personal needs of middle school students.  They find acceptance in groups and cooperate as teams to compete with other teams. In addition, all words needed to com­plete oral and written puz­zles ap­pear in the lesson. All sentences follow the rules of Standard Amer­i­can Written English. There are no intentional errors for students to identify and correct.

Whether your public middle school students meet the Writing to Win routines in hard copies or online (Fall 2014)  at www.mysatori.com, they will be engaged in writing-based learning from the first day.

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Public High Schools

“Writing in grades 9-12 requires serious and challenging thought. What do Writing to Win routines have for the wide varie­ty in levels of performance among high school learners?” …

Fortunately, writing is the ulti­mate differentiator in teaching and learning. It automatically adjusts to the abil­ity level and learning styles of students. This explains why the tight design of Writ­ing to Win routines works so well in grades 9-12. High Schools from Valdosta to To­le­do to Rapid City give evidence of this very fact. Their leaders helped us realize the strengths of our instructional routines for grades 9-12 students.

  • In our UNDERSTANDINGS routine, the strength lies in two of the five key practices, “Quantify teacher expectations” and “Prompt PALS strategies.” High School students want to know from teachers exactly how many key terms or ideas they need to explain in each entry, and they value immediate peer respons­es that are robust (PALS response strategies). When students acquire the key terms pre­­sented in the ELA, math, science or social studies lessons, they build mastery of curriculum content one standard at a time.
  • In our STRUCTURES routine, it is the organization of the Working Portfolios of the Writ­ing Cycle. The standards-based writing prompts condition high school stu­dents to cite two or more relevant short and extended reading texts every time they write. The prewriting tools make analysis of the writ­ing prompts and plan­­­ning first drafts straight­for­ward and orderly. Concrete and easy-to-under­stand strategies for revision and proofreading are enhanc­ed by the accountability of PALS (peer-assisted learning system) and a sim­ple system of student self-assess­­ment. Student-friendly rubrics put high school students at ease with peer-evaluation and self-evaluation.
  • In our PATTERNS routine, it is PALS coaching one another on written prac­tice in a lesson.  Grades 9-12 students are well equipped to help each other learn a new sentence pat­tern. In addition, all words needed to complete oral and writ­ten puz­zles appear in the lesson. All sentences follow the rules of Stan­dard Amer­i­can Written Eng­lish. There are no intentional errors to distract or trick students.

Whether your public high school students meet the Writing to Win routines in hard copies or online (Fall 2014) at www.mysatori.com, they will be engaged in writing-based learning from the first day.

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Traditional Private Schools

A number of schools that helped develop the Writing to Win routines were privately owned and operated. Our routines are tightly designed, but generic to permit con­centration on religious instruction, patriotism, military science or content skills.…

A variety of preparatory, Adventist, Muslim, Christian and Jewish schools helped us realize the strengths of our instructional routines for their students.

  • In our UNDERSTANDINGS routine, the singular strength of critical-thinking journal stra­te­gies is its vocabulary-building power. When students master the key terms pre­sented in the lessons of the curriculum, they improve their performance on tests of En­glish, math, science or social studies.
  • In our STRUCTURES routine, the model writing prompts of the Writing Cycle allow teachers to con­­nect the writing to any part of the curriculum. Pre­writing makes analysis of the writing prompts and planning first drafts concrete and orderly. Concrete and easy-to-under­stand strategies for revision and proofreading are enhanced by the accountability of PALS (peer-assisted learning system) and a sim­ple system of student self-assess­­ment. Concrete and easy-to-under­stand strategies for revision and proofreading are bolster­ed by the accountability of PALS (peer-assisted learning system) and a sim­ple system of student self-assess­­ment.
  • In our PATTERNS routine, group oral practice makes sentence patterns under­standable for a variety of writers. All words needed to complete writ­ten puz­zles appear in the lesson. All sentences follow the rules of Standard Amer­i­can Written English. There are no intentional errors for students to identify and correct.

Whether your private school students meet the Writing to Win routines in hard cop­ies or online (Fall 2014) at www.mysatori.com, they will be engaged in writing-based learning from the first day.

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Montessori Schools

The Writing to Win instructional routines form a special fit in the Montessori phi­losophy of teaching and learning.…

  • They empower students to analyze and reflect on the Great Lessons curriculum in significant ways.
  • They provide a fully designed system for a less-defined part of the Mon­tes­sori curriculum.
  • The student-friendly materials promote individual exploration.
  • The five key practices keep the student learners steeped in peer responses, a key Montessori value.

In our UNDERSTANDINGS routine, Montessori teachers post a full log of critical-think­ing journal prompts for students (15-22 prompts), allowing students to write the entries related to a learn­ing task in the order they choose to work on them. Since many Montessori par­ents insist on their students taking state or national achieve­ment tests, the vo­cab­u­lary-building power of journal writing prepares them to meet items on tests of En­glish, math, science or social studies with ease.

In our STRUCTURES routine, Montessori teachers post the nine tasks of a Writing Cycle in advance. Students complete the writing tasks in the order they choose to complete related learning tasks. The special feature of this routine that Montessori stu­dents value the most is PALS (peer-assisted learning system). They know that when they complete a writing task, they may read it aloud for a substantial peer response. Once they understand the structure of Working Portfolios, they ask to design their own future portfolios.

In our PATTERNS routine, all Sentence Building lessons are presented inductively, a hallmark of Montessori methods. Group oral practice provides frequent team-build­ing opportunities for pairs or small groups. Lessons can also be completed indepen­dently with benefit. All sentences follow the rules of Standard Amer­i­can Written Eng­lish. There are no intentional errors for students to identify and correct.

Whether your Montessori students meet the Writing to Win routines in hard copies or online (Fall 2014) at www.mysatori.com, they will be engaged in writing-based learning from the first day.

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Home Schoolers

Home school organizations have participated in the development of Writing to Win instructional routines. Writing-based learning is a complementary partner of family-based teaching and learning.…

Student materials are so friendly that the students of­ten drive the routines. Parents and older or younger siblings make effective PALS (peer-assisted learning system) for students. Keeping the five key prac­tices of writ­ing-based learning in play, students move through the rou­tines of the learning se­quence at their own pace.

  • In our UNDERSTANDINGS routine, the singular strength of critical-thinking journal stra­te­gies is its vocabulary-building power. Home-school students are still required to take state or national tests in many states. When students master the key terms pre­sented in the lessons of the curriculum, they read items on tests of En­glish, math, science or social studies in the curriculum with ease.
  • In our STRUCTURES routine, the writing prompts of the Writing Cycle allow parents to con­­nect their students’ writing to any part of the curriculum. Pre­writing tools make analysis of the writing prompts and planning first drafts concrete and orderly. Revision and proofreading stra­tegies are simple and easy to learn. All writing tasks rely on ac­countability of PALS (peer-assisted learning sys­tem) and a simple system of student self-assess­ment.
  • In our PATTERNS routine, group oral practice makes sentence patterns under­standable for a variety of writers. All words needed to com­plete writ­ten puz­zles appear in the lesson. All sentences follow the rules of Stan­dard Amer­i­can Written English. There are no intentional errors for stu­dents to identify and correct.

Whether your home-school students meet the Writing to Win routines in hard cop­ies or online (Fall 2014) at www.mysatori.com, they will be engaged in writing-based learning from the first day.

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Special Education

You may ask, "How do I adjust the Writing to Win routines in teaching my special-needs stu­dents to meet state stan­dards?" Actually, very little adjustment other than pacing is required.…

Writing to Win routines are especially suited to special-needs writ­­ers. Check out the action research results (hyperlink) for the grade of your stu­dents to see how regular implementations of Writing to Win close achievement gaps in student performance on tests of knowledge.

  • In our UNDERSTANDINGS routine, several of the critical-thinking journal strategies were designed for special needs students. Each strategy presents a writing task in concrete and simple ways to help students build mastery of the curriculum content one standard at a time.
  • In our STRUCTURES routine, it is the key practice of PALS (peer-assisted learning sys­tem). Special-needs students coach each other through the Writing Cycle scaffold and eagerly em­brace PALS response stra­tegies with benefit. Student-friendly vocabulary and ru­brics deliver needed mental struc­ture for their minds.
  • In our PATTERNS routine, the sentence-combining puzzles make language skills instruction more accessible to special-needs students than any other approach. Whole-group oral practice makes sen­tence patterns under­stand­able for a variety of writers. In addi­tion, all words that stu­dents need to complete written sentence patterns ap­pear in the lesson. All sentences fol­low the rules of Standard Amer­i­can Writ­­ten English. There are no intentional errors for students to identify and cor­­rect.

Whether your special-needs students meet the Writing to Win routines in hard cop­ies or online (Fall 2014) at www.mysatori.com, they will be engaged in writing-based learning from the first day.

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Adult Literacy

You may ask, "How do I adjust the Writing to Win routines in teaching my adult learn­ers to reach functional literacy?" Actually, very little adjustment other than pac­ing is required.…

Writing to Win routines are especially suited to adult learn­ers. This is born out in adult literacy centers across the northwest region of the Office of Vocational and Adult Education.

  • In our UNDERSTANDINGS routine, the critical-thinking journal strategies break down the writing task in concrete and simple ways to reach a variety of writers.
  • In our STRUCTURES routine, it is the key practice of PALS (peer-assisted learn­ing sys­tem). Adult students coach each other and eagerly em­brace PALS response stra­tegies with benefit. Student-friendly vocabulary and ru­brics imprint needed mental structure in their minds.
  • In our PATTERNS routine, the sentence-combining puzzles make language skills instruction more accessible to adult learners than any other approach. Whole-group oral practice provides special support in learning new sen­tence pat­terns. In addi­tion, all words that stu­dents need to complete written sentence patterns ap­pear in the lesson. All sentences follow the rules of Stan­dard Amer­i­can Writ­­ten English. There are no intentional errors for stu­dents to identify and cor­­rect.

Whether your adult literacy students meet the Writing to Win routines in hard cop­ies or online (Fall 2014) at www.mysatori.com, they will be engaged in writing-based learning from the first day.

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ESOL Programs

If your question is, "How do Writing to Win routines that work so well with native language learners meet the needs of students who are learning English as their second language?” …

Our action research reports show that ESOL stu­dents are served very well in classrooms where our routines are faithfully implemented.

  • In our UNDERSTANDINGS routine, the critical-thinking journal strategies break down the writing task in concrete and simple ways to reach second language learners. Additionally, the writing of students is assessed for accur­acy and completeness of thought, not the fine features of grammatical con­ven­tions.
  • In our STRUCTURES routine, it is the key practice of PALS (peer-assisted learn­ing sys­tem). More proficient ESOL students coach less proficient writers, and they all eagerly em­brace PALS response stra­tegies with benefit. Student-friendly vocabulary and ru­brics imprint needed mental structure in their minds.
  • In our PATTERNS routine, the sentence-combining puzzles make language skills instruction more accessible to ESOL learners than any other approach. Whole-group oral practice provides special support in learning new sen­tence pat­terns. In addi­tion, all words that stu­dents need to complete written sentence patterns ap­pear in the lesson. All sentences follow the rules of Stan­­dard Amer­i­can Writ­­ten English. There are no intentional errors for stu­dents to identify and cor­­rect.

Whether your ESOL students meet the Writing to Win routines in hard cop­ies or online (Fall 2014) at www.mysatori.com, they will be engaged in writing-based learning from the first day.

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